Enduring Access to Rich Media Content: Understanding Use and Usability Requirements | D-Lib

Through an NEH-funded initiative, Cornell University Library is creating a technical, curatorial, and managerial framework for preserving access to complex born-digital new media objects. The Library's Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art provides the testbed for this project. This collection of complex interactive born-digital artworks are used by students, faculty, and artists from various disciplines. Interactive digital assets are far more complex to preserve and manage than single uniform digital media files.

The Human Network | The Digital Shift

The librarians who are thriving most consistently in the digital era are those who have found a way to operate as a node in a network of libraries and librarians. They are agents of change, actively creating the future instead of constantly reacting to it—or worse, resisting it. Jessamyn West, [a] librarian in rural Vermont [and a 2002 LJ Mover & Shaker], is one such creative, networked librarian. West is connected to her peers both in libraries and in other information-related environments, including the world of technology.

Testing a Permanent Digital Storage Archive | Digital Preservation Matters

Testing a Permanent Digital Storage Archive – Part 1. Chris Erickson. September 9, 2015.
For about the past seven years I have been testing the M-Disc permanent digital storage media. The M-Disc is designed to use inert, permanent materials, so that digital data written to the discs are permanent.

EpubCheck 4.0 | Mad File Format Science

EPUB is the favorite format for e-books (ignoring Amazon, which like to be incompatible so it can lock users in). EpubCheck is the open-source industry standard for validating EPUB files. If you’re an author creating your own e-book files, you should run them against EpubCheck before releasing them. It’ll make hosting sites happier, since they’ll probably run it themselves and will like your book better if it passes. A book that passes EpubCheck will also give you fewer headaches with readers complaining it doesn’t work on their reader.

Describing Records Before They Arrive: An NDSR Project Update | The Signal

At the American Institute of Architects, the AIA Archives is building a digital repository for permanent born-digital records that capture the intellectual capital of the AIA, or have continuing value to the practice of architecture. In a story that is probably familiar to many readers, the AIA has important digital records that are not currently stored in a central repository, and that are subject to accidental deletions or movement on the AIA’s shared drive.

Open-Source Email Archiving Software Expands with IMLS Grant

The ePADD open-source email archiving and processing platform developed by Stanford University Libraries was awarded a $685,000 National Leadership Grant by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) on August 31. The software “supports archival processes around the appraisal, ingest, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives,” according to the project site.

PDF/A as OAIS SIP container? | Mad File Format Science

A proposal to use PDF/A as a Submission Information Package (SIP) under the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) model has generated a small stir on Twitter.

The aim of a SIP is to deliver a collection of documents in a form suitable for ingesting into an archive. It needs to have enough metadata to create a proper Archive Information Package (AIP). The model doesn’t specify what SIP format(s) an archive should accept. XML files following well-known archival schemas such as METS for the overall package and PREMIS for preservation information are popular.

Houston Library Develops a Digital Library Card | Goodreader

Thousands of libraries all over North America issue physical cards that patrons can use to checkout materials at the branch or to use online. In a world of e-readers, smartphones and tablets this is counterproductive and the Harris County Library in Houston Texas has just developed the first digital library card.

The program is dubbed iKnow, doesn’t offer all of the amenities of a full-service library card. It only allows you to borrow audiobooks, e-books, music and video online via Overdrive and can’t be used to check out hard copies of books.

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